Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55b6f6c457-rq6d8 Total loading time: 0.207 Render date: 2021-09-23T13:03:07.099Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Modeling of Nanophase Connectivity in Substance-Void Composite by Oblique Deposition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

T. Motohiro
Affiliation:
Toyota Central Research & Development Laboratories, Inc., 41–1, Nagakute-cho, Aichi-gun, Aichi-ken, 480–11, Japan
S. Noda
Affiliation:
Toyota Central Research & Development Laboratories, Inc., 41–1, Nagakute-cho, Aichi-gun, Aichi-ken, 480–11, Japan
A. Isogai
Affiliation:
Toyota Central Research & Development Laboratories, Inc., 41–1, Nagakute-cho, Aichi-gun, Aichi-ken, 480–11, Japan
O. Kamigaito
Affiliation:
Toyota Central Research & Development Laboratories, Inc., 41–1, Nagakute-cho, Aichi-gun, Aichi-ken, 480–11, Japan
Get access

Abstract

Obliquely vapor deposited thin film is characterized by its unique inclined columnar structure. Recently one of the authors developed thin film optical quarter-wave plate by oblique deposition. SEM observation revealed the inclined columns of ∼10 nm in diameter and ∼3 microns in length. Its birefringence indicates those columns are less closely spaced in the plane of vapor incidence (PVI) than normal to PVI, composing alternatively stacked substance layer (columns laterally connected with each other)-void layer(residual space) nanophase composite with 2–2 connectivity. The growth mechanism of the inclined columnar structure has been successfully explained by the self-shadowing effect in 2D-space computer simulation in PVI. However, the connectivity development perpendicular to PVI is not self-evident. In the present work, we performed simple 3D-space simulation of oblique depositipon and observed substantial feature of the connectivity development and related features on this nanophase structure.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Panel Report on Clusters and Cluster-Assembled Materials, Monterey, California, January 1988, Council on Materials Science, Division of Material Science, U.S. Department of Energy.Google Scholar
2. Wang, Y. and Herron, N., J. Phys. Chem. 91, 257 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Motohiro, T. and Taga, Y., Applied Optics 28, 2466 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Keitoku, S. and Nishioka, K., Jap. J. Appl. Phys. 20, 1249 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Dirks, A. G. and Leamy, H. J., Thin Solid Films 47, 219 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Newham, R. E., Skinner, D. P. and Cross, L. E., Mat. Res. Bull. 13, 525 (1978), Pergamon Press, USA.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Motohiro, T. and Taga, Y., Thin Solid Films 72, L71 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Born, M. and Wolf, E., Pronciples of Optics, third ed., Pergamon, Oxford, (1965), p. 705.Google Scholar
9. Henderson, D., Brodsky, M. H. and Chaudhari, P., Appl. Phys. Lett., 25, 641 (1974).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Modeling of Nanophase Connectivity in Substance-Void Composite by Oblique Deposition
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Modeling of Nanophase Connectivity in Substance-Void Composite by Oblique Deposition
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Modeling of Nanophase Connectivity in Substance-Void Composite by Oblique Deposition
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *