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The Microstructure and Giant Magnetoresistance of NiFeAg Thin Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 September 2012

Michael A. Parker
Affiliation:
IBM, Advanced Storage and Retrieval, IBM Fellow Program, 5600 Cottle Road, San Jose, CA 95193
K. R. Coffey
Affiliation:
IBM, Advanced Storage and Retrieval, IBM Fellow Program, 5600 Cottle Road, San Jose, CA 95193
T. L. Hylton
Affiliation:
IBM, Advanced Storage and Retrieval, IBM Fellow Program, 5600 Cottle Road, San Jose, CA 95193
J. K. Howard
Affiliation:
IBM, Advanced Storage and Retrieval, IBM Fellow Program, 5600 Cottle Road, San Jose, CA 95193
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Abstract

Although Much has been published on giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) in co-deposited thin films [1–4], only little [5] has been published on the structure-property relationships limiting the effect. Here, we report the results of microstructural characterization of NiFeAg thin films that exhibit a GMR effect. The as-deposited films show a sizeable GMR effect. The Maximum GMR effect observed was 6.4% with -4k0e FWHM of the 6P/P peak. Upon annealing these films, the GMR at first increases, and then decreases. We present microstructural evidence from TEM and XRD, amongst other techniques, which shows that this is a consequence of the initial NiFeAg thin film agglomerating into NiFe grains in a predominantly Ag segregant Matrix. Upon extended annealing, excessive grain growth leads to a decrease in the GMR as predicted by the model of Berkowitz, et al. [1].

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1993

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References

1. Berkowitz, A.E., Mitchell, J. R., Carey, M.J., Young, A.P., Zhang, S., Spada, F.E., Parker, F.T., Hutten, A. and Thomas, G., Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 3745 (1992).Google Scholar
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