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Mg-Ti: A Possible Biodegradable, Biocompatible, Mechanically Matched Material for Temporary Implants

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011

Ilona Hoffmann*
Affiliation:
Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, U.S.A.
Yang-Tse Cheng
Affiliation:
Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, U.S.A.
David A. Puleo
Affiliation:
Center for Biomedical Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY40506, U.S.A.
Guangling Song
Affiliation:
Chemical Sciences and Materials Systems Laboratory, General Motors Global Research and Development Center, Warren, MI 48098, U.S.A.
Richard A. Waldo
Affiliation:
Chemical Sciences and Materials Systems Laboratory, General Motors Global Research and Development Center, Warren, MI 48098, U.S.A.
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Abstract

In recent years there has been a renewed interest in magnesium alloys for applications as temporary biomedical implants because magnesium is both biocompatible and biodegradable. However, the rapid corrosion rate of magnesium in physiological environments has prevented its successful use for temporary implants. Since alloying is one of the routes to slow down corrosion, we report in this publication our investigation of Mg-Ti alloys fabricated by high-energy ball milling as possible materials for biocompatible and biodegradable implants. Titanium was chosen mainly because of its proven biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Corrosion tests carried out by immersing the Mg-Ti alloys in Hank’s Solution at 37°C showed significantly improved corrosion resistance of the alloy in comparison to pure magnesium. Thus, Mg-Ti alloys are promising new biodegradable and biocompatible materials for temporary implants.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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