Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-q9r9l Total loading time: 0.25 Render date: 2022-07-02T12:47:23.935Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Mass Spectrometric Analysis of a High Pressure, Inductively Coupled Plasma During Diamond Film Growth

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

Peter G. Greuel
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry, 207 Pleasant St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455
Hyun J. Yoon
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota, Department of Electrical Engineering, 200 Union St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455
Douglas W. Ernie
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota, Department of Electrical Engineering, 200 Union St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455
Jeffrey T. Roberts*
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry, 207 Pleasant St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed
Get access

Abstract

Determination of the gas phase composition at or near a substrate surface during plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition presents a challenging problem. The species located at a growing surface include highly reactive radicals which are difficult to detect in atmospheric plasma conditions. A system has been designed which consists of an inductively coupled rf plasma reactor linked to a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) via a supersonic convergent-divergent nozzle. Differential pumping in the transient stages allows the plasma chamber to be operated at or near atmospheric pressures, while facilitating the detection of reactant species present in the growth boundary layer with the QMS.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Girshick, S. L., Li, C., Yu, B. W. and Han, H., Plasma Chem. Plasma Process. 13, 181 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Frenklach, M. and Wang, H., Phys. Rev. B 43, 1520 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Frenklach, M. and Spear, K. E., J. Mater. Res. 3, 133 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Piekarczyk, W. and Yarbrough, W. A., J. Cryst. Growth 108, 583 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Bou, P., Boettner, J. C. and Vandenbulcke, L., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 31, 1505 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Bou, P., Boettner, J. C. and Vandenbulcke, L., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 31, 2931 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Harris, S. J. and Goodwin, D. G., J. Phys. Chem. 97, 23 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Benton, D. N. and Harris, S. J., J. Chem. Phys. 96, 2371 (1992).Google Scholar
9. Harris, S. J., Appl. Phys. Lett. 56, 2298 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Mitomo, T., Ohta, T., Kondoh, E. and Ohtsuka, K., J. Appl. Phys. 70, 4532 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Campargue, A., Chenevier, M., Fayette, L., Marcus, B., Mermoux, M. and Ross, A. J., Appl. Phys. Lett. 62, 134 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Pastel, P. W. and Varhue, W. J., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A9, 1129 (1990).Google Scholar
13. Stalder, K. R. and Sharpless, R. L., J. Appl. Phys. 68, 6187 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Hsu, W. L., Appl. Phys. Lett. 59, 1427 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15. Harris, S. J., Weiner, A. M. and Perry, T. A., Appl. Phys. Lett. 53, 1605 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Johnson, C. E., Weimer, W. A. and Cerio, F. M., J. Mater. Res. 7, 1427 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17. Takenchi, K. and Yoshida, T., J. Appl. Phys. 71, 2636 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18. Okeke, L. and Stoeri, H., Plasma Chem. and Plasma Process. 11, 489 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19. Anderson, James D., Modern Compressible Flow: with Historical Perspective (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1982).Google Scholar
20. Toyoda, H., Kojima, H. and Sugai, H., Appl. Phys. Lett. 54, 1507 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21. Field, F.H. and Franklin, J.L., Electronic Impact Phenomena and the Properties of Gaseous Ions (Academic, New York, 1970).Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Mass Spectrometric Analysis of a High Pressure, Inductively Coupled Plasma During Diamond Film Growth
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Mass Spectrometric Analysis of a High Pressure, Inductively Coupled Plasma During Diamond Film Growth
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Mass Spectrometric Analysis of a High Pressure, Inductively Coupled Plasma During Diamond Film Growth
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *