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Mapping Nanomechanical Properties near Internal Interfaces in Biological Materials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 September 2011

Igor Zlotnikov
Affiliation:
Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam 14476, Germany
Haika Drezner
Affiliation:
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000, Israel
Doron Shilo
Affiliation:
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000, Israel
Barbara Aichmayer
Affiliation:
Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam 14476, Germany
Yannicke Dauphin
Affiliation:
Micropaléontologie, UFR TEB, Université P. & M. Curie, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France
Emil Zolotoyabko
Affiliation:
Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam 14476, Germany Faculty of Materials Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000, Israel
Peter Fratzl
Affiliation:
Department of Biomaterials, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam 14476, Germany
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Abstract

Modulus mapping using nanoDMA (Dynamic Mechanical Analysis) is a recently developed technique based on a nanoindentation instrument equipped with an AFM-like piezoscanner and dynamic force modulation system. The surface properties, storage and loss moduli are quantified based on the Hertz model for the contact mechanics of the sample-tip configuration. In this approach, the applied load, topography features, and their size may have a pronounced effect on the obtained results. In order to demonstrate that, internal interfaces of deep sea sponge (Monorhaphis chuni), which comprises alternating layers of relatively thick (4 μm in average) biosilica and thin (60 nm) organic material, were characterized using the nanoDMA modulus mapping technique. Experimental data were analyzed in tight interrelation with finite element simulations. This combination allowed us to evaluate elastic modulus of a 60 nm wide organic layers in M. chuni.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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References

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