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Magnetic nanoparticles for space applications

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

S. K. Sharma
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, H. P. University, Shimla-171005 India
Ravi Kumar
Affiliation:
Material Science Division, Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi-110067 India
S. N. Dolia
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302004 India
V. V. Siva Kumar
Affiliation:
Material Science Division, Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi-110067 India
Mahavir Singh
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, H. P. University, Shimla-171005 India
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Abstract

Radiation resistant ferrite materials have potential applications in space station. Mg-Mn spinel ferrite was choosen for this study because of its radiation resistance and potential for use as an insulator in radiation environments. The radiation damage expected in these environments can be quickly and conveniently simulated using ion irradiation. The results of swift heavy ion irradiation induced modifications in the magnetization behavior of the Mg-Mn ferrite nanoparticles have been investigated using 100 MeV Ni8+ ion irradiation. To ensure the singlephase spinel structure of the system powder x-ray diffraction patterns has been performed. The powder samples were irradiated at three different fluences in the range 1×1012-5×1013 ions/cm2. Isothermal dc magnetization studies have been performed using SQUID and vibration sample magnetometer (VSM) on the pristine as well as on the irradiated samples at 20 K and 300 K. With irradiation saturation magnetization remains almost constant with ions irradiation. The coercivity values of the materials decreased about 5% with the fluence 1×1013 ions/cm2 as compare to the pristine nanoparticles. The results have been explained on the basis of the existence of surface defects produced by swift heavy ions, which generate orientational disorder of surface spins. The behavior of saturation magnetization with irradiations makes these nanoparticles suitable for memory devices in the space research.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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