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Layer Disordering and Carrier Concentration in Heavily Carbon-Doped AlGaAs/GaAs Superlattices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

H. M. You
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0300
T. Y. Tan
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0300
U. M. Gösele
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0300
G. E. Höfler
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801
K. C. Hsieh
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801
N. Holonyak Jr.
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801
S.-T. Lee
Affiliation:
Eastman Kodak Company, Corporate Research Laboratory, Rochester, NY 14650
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Abstract

Al-Ga interdiffusion, carbon acceptor diffusion, and hole reduction were studied in carbondoped Al0.4Ga0.6As/GaAs superlattices (SL). Al-Ga interdiffusion was found to be most prominent for Ga-rich annealing, with the hole concentrations in the SL almost intact during annealing. For As-rich annealing, the interdiffusivity values, DAI.Ga, are in approximate agreement with those predicted by the Fermi-level effect model, and the hole concentrations in the SL decreased dramatically after annealing. By analyzing the measured hole concentration profiles, it was found that both carbon acceptor diffusion and reduction have occurred during annealing, with both depending on As4 pressure values to the one quarter power. These As4 pressure dependencies indicate that carbon diffuses via the interstitial-substitutional mechanism while hole reduction is governed by a precipitation mechanism.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1993

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Layer Disordering and Carrier Concentration in Heavily Carbon-Doped AlGaAs/GaAs Superlattices
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