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Laser Spectroscopy of Materials Used in Paintings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2011

Londa J. Larson
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90024-1569
Kyeong-Sook Kim Shin
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90024-1569
Jeffrey I. Zink
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90024-1569
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Abstract

A wide variety of natural resins, waxes, gums, drying oils and proteinaceous materials used on paintings are photoluminescent. The photoluminescence spectra of these materials are reported and discussed. The application of this technique towards the identification of these materials is considered. Both bulk materials and films prepared from selected bulk materials were studied and a comparison is made between the bulk and film samples. Temperature and excitation wavelength studies are reported and discussed for several of the samples.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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References

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