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Large Field Emission from Vertically Well-aligned Carbon Nanotubes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011

Jung Inn Sohn
Affiliation:
Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwangju Institute of Science and Technology (K-JIST), Kwangju, Korea 500-712.
Seonghoon Lee
Affiliation:
Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwangju Institute of Science and Technology (K-JIST), Kwangju, Korea 500-712.
Yoon-Ho Song
Affiliation:
Micro-Electronics Tech. Labs., ETRI, Taejon, Korea 305-350.
Sung-Yool Choi
Affiliation:
Micro-Electronics Tech. Labs., ETRI, Taejon, Korea 305-350.
Kyoung-Ik Cho
Affiliation:
Micro-Electronics Tech. Labs., ETRI, Taejon, Korea 305-350.
Kee-Soo Nam
Affiliation:
Micro-Electronics Tech. Labs., ETRI, Taejon, Korea 305-350.
Young-Il Kang
Affiliation:
Micro-Electronics Tech. Labs., ETRI, Taejon, Korea 305-350.
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Abstract

We have grown well-aligned carbon nanotube arrays by thermal chemical vapor deposition at 800°C on Fe nanoparticles deposited by a pulsed laser on a porous Si substrate. Porous Si substrates were prepared by the electrochemical etching of p-Si(100) wafers with resistivities of 3 to 6 ωcm. These well-aligned carbon nanotube field emitter arrays are suitable for electron emission applications such as cold-cathode flat panel displays and vacuum microelectronic devices like microwave power amplifier tubes. Field emission characterization has been performed on the CNT-cathode diode device at room temperature and in a vacuum chamber below 10−6 Torr. The anode is maintained at a distance of 60[.proportional]m away from the carbon nanotube cathode arrays through an insulating spacer of polyvinyl film. The measured field emitting area is 4.0×10−5cm2. Our carbon nanotube field emitter arrays emit 1mA/cm2at the electric field, 2V/[.proportional]m. And they emit a large current density as high as 80mA/cm2 at 3V/[.proportional]m. The open tip structure of our carbon nanotubes and their good adhesion through Fe nanoparticles to the Si substrate are part of the reason why we can attain a large field emission current density within a low field. The field emitter arrays in our diode device are vertically well-aligned carbon nanotubes on the Si-wafer substrate.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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