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IRAS Analysis of the Early Stage of Thermal Oxidation on a SiC Surface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011

Tamotsu Jikimoto
Affiliation:
Yokosuka Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196, Japan.
Hidekazu Tsuchida
Affiliation:
Yokosuka Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196, Japan.
Isaho Kamata
Affiliation:
Yokosuka Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196, Japan.
Kunikazu Izumi
Affiliation:
Yokosuka Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196, Japan.
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Abstract

The structure of thermal oxide film thinner than 2nm on a SiC surface was investigated using in-situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). In the case of oxide films on 6H-SiC(0001), the peak frequencies of the TO mode (≈1050 cm−1) of the Si-O-Si stretch vibration shifts toward lower wave number with decreasing oxide thickness in the range of 0.2nm to 2nm and shift toward a higher frequency as the growth temperature rises. The LO mode (≈1250 cm−1) of the Si-O-Si stretch vibration remains almost constant with the increase in oxide thickness from 0.2 nm to 2 nm. These results indicate that there is a considerable difference in the structure near the interface between a thermally grown oxide layer formed on SiC and one formed on Si.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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IRAS Analysis of the Early Stage of Thermal Oxidation on a SiC Surface
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