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Investigations into Demineralized Cortical Bone

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2011

Ekaterina Novitskaya
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
Ana Castro-Ceseña
Affiliation:
Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada, Ensenada, México
Po-Yu Chen
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
Joshua Vasquez
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
Robert Urbaniak
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
Steve Lee
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
Gustavo Hirata
Affiliation:
Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ensenada, México
Joanna McKittrick
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
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Abstract

Partially demineralized (DM) bone is of interest due to its promising osteointegrative properties for advanced bone grafts. Structural features of partially DM (35 vol.%, 45 vol.% and 55 vol.% reduction), and untreated cortical bone samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were investigated by compression testing in three anatomical directions at different stages of DM. The radial direction appears to be the stiffest and strongest bone direction for the all DM stages.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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