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Investigations into Current Modulation Mechanisms in Low Operating Voltage Organic Thin Film Transistors and Their Relationship to the Materials Employed

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 July 2011

Daniel Elkington
Affiliation:
Centre for Organic Electronics, Department of Physics, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
Xiaojing Zhou
Affiliation:
Centre for Organic Electronics, Department of Physics, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
Warwick Belcher
Affiliation:
Centre for Organic Electronics, Department of Physics, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
Paul Dastoor
Affiliation:
Centre for Organic Electronics, Department of Physics, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
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Abstract

Systematic studies have been conducted on the electrical characteristics of poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). The OTFTs have been characterized at low-operating voltages and deductions have been made regarding the current modulation mechanisms involved. Irreproducibility of transfer characteristics in these devices beyond a certain gate voltage, as well as a slow time-dependant component to drain current at certain gate voltages, indicates electrochemical changes occurring in the device during operation. It is hoped that this work can help to improve the understanding of OTFTs of this type and, in turn, their performance in the future.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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References

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