Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-qcsxw Total loading time: 0.606 Render date: 2022-08-19T14:46:27.086Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Investigation of Cantilever Resonance Applied to Potentiometric Sensing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Goutam Koley
Affiliation:
koley@engr.sc.edu, University of South Carolina, Electrical Engineering, 3A12 Swearingen Center, Columbia, SC, 29208, United States, 8037773469
Lakshminarayanan Lakshmanan
Affiliation:
lakshmal@mailbox.sc.edu, University of South Carolina, Electrical Engineering, 1B27 Swearingen Center, Columbia, SC, 29208, United States
Get access

Abstract

We demonstrate a highly sensitive potentiometric gas sensor based on a resonating Si microcantilever. Using a scanning probe microscope based set up in non-contact mode, the microcantilever was made to oscillate at its resonance frequency with periodically changing amplitude, using simultaneous mechanical and electrical excitation sources. The variation of the oscillation amplitude was found to be extremely sensitive to changes in surface potential, and served as a linear indicator for surface work function changes caused by molecular adsorption. The microcantilever sensor was found to be able to detect changes in surface potential down to 50 microvolt, which is basically limited by the system noise. When applied to sensing hydrogen using platinum coated cantilevers, it was observed that the microcantilever sensor can detect 1000 ppm hydrogen with an estimated lower limit of the detection time of 70 ms, at a cantilever-ground electrode distance of ∼10 micron. Several parameters, such as ac signal amplitude, cantilever – reference electrode distance, quality factor, area, and spring constant of the cantilever, can be adjusted to significantly enhance the sensitivity, possibly by orders of magnitude. Excitation of the cantilever at subharmonic resonance frequencies was also performed to study possible parametric resonance effects. In this system it was possible to observe sub-harmonic resonance of order more than 50 (i.e. lower than one-fiftieth the resonance frequency).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Pederson, C., Jespersen, S. T., Jacobson, K. W., Krog, J. P., Christensen, C., and Thomsen, E. V., Sensors and Actuators A 115, 617 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Xu, Y., Chiu, C., Jiang, F., Lin, Q., and Tai, Y., Sensors and Actuators A 121, 253 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Llic, B., Craighead, H. G., Krylov, S., Senaratne, W., Ober, C., and Neuzil, P., J. Appl. Phys. 95, 3694 (2004).Google Scholar
4. Huang, X. M. H., Manolidis, M., Jun, S. C., and Hone, J., Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 143104 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Lin, L., Howe, R. T., and Pisano, A. P., J. Microelectromech. Systems 7, 286 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Dec, A., Suyama, K., IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory and Techniques 48, 1943 (2000).Google Scholar
7. hu, Z., Thundat, T., and Warmack, R. J., J. Appl. Phys. 90, 427 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Fritz, J., Baller, M. K., Lang, H. P., Rothuizen, H., Vettiger, P., Meyer, E., Güntherodt, H.-J., Ch. Gerber, J. K. Gimzewski 288, 316 (2000).Google Scholar
9. Pinnaduwage, L. A., Boiadjiev, V., Hawk, J. E., and Thundat, T., Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 1471 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Cui, Y., Wei, W., Park, H., and Lieber, C. M., Science 293, 1289 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Koley, G. and Spencer, M. G., J. Appl. Phys. 90, 337 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Shern, C. S., Chinese J. Phys. 30, 841 (1992).Google Scholar
13. Zhang, W., and Turner, K. L., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 23(4), 841 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Investigation of Cantilever Resonance Applied to Potentiometric Sensing
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Investigation of Cantilever Resonance Applied to Potentiometric Sensing
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Investigation of Cantilever Resonance Applied to Potentiometric Sensing
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *