Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-d2wc8 Total loading time: 0.222 Render date: 2021-10-17T21:24:01.946Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Interfacing Conducting Polymers and Biological Macromolecules: A Case Study of Insecticide Biosensor Development

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Kenneth Marx
Affiliation:
Center for Advanced Materials and Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA. 01854
Madhu Ayyagari
Affiliation:
Center for Advanced Materials and Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA. 01854
Sanjay Kamtekar
Affiliation:
Center for Advanced Materials and Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA. 01854
Rajiv Pande
Affiliation:
Center for Advanced Materials and Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA. 01854
Jeong Ok Lim
Affiliation:
Center for Advanced Materials and Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA. 01854
Manjunath Kamath
Affiliation:
Center for Advanced Materials and Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA. 01854
K. G. Chittibabu
Affiliation:
Center for Advanced Materials and Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA. 01854
Sukant Tripathy
Affiliation:
Center for Advanced Materials and Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA. 01854
Jayant Kumar
Affiliation:
Center for Advanced Materials and Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA. 01854
Lynne Samuelson
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Natick RD&E Center, Biotechnology Division, Natick, MA. 01760
Joseph Akkara
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Natick RD&E Center, Biotechnology Division, Natick, MA. 01760
David Kaplan
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Natick RD&E Center, Biotechnology Division, Natick, MA. 01760
Get access

Abstract

The creation of smart materials is a current goal of many laboratories including our own. We are involved in studying a number of thin film and monolayer systems which share the common features of involving highly conjugated conducting organic polymers and the evolved properties of specific biological macromolecules. In this report we describe a generic ‘cassette’ methodology for immobilizing biotinylated biological macromolecules to hydrophobic surfaces using a novel class of conducting copolymers of polythiophene. These copolymers are derivatized with long alkyl chains and biotin moieties to bind, respectively, to the hydrophobic surface and the biotinylated species, through the biotin - streptavidin interaction. We utilize the monolayer ‘cassette’ approach to attach a signal transducing biomolecule alkaline phosphatase to the surface of a glass capillary. This produces a flexible system in which chemiluminescence provides the basis for a useful measurement strategy. A novel technique involving the generation of chemiluminescence signal from alkaline phosphatase catalyzed dephosphorylation of a macrocyclic phosphate compound is described. Detection of paraoxon and methyl parathion, both enzyme inhibitors, has been achieved at ppb levels. The technique is rapid, sensitive, and is applicable to the detection of all organophosphorus based insecticides. The technique will be used in developing a fiber;optic biosensor for remote detection of insecticides.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Samuelson, L.A., Miller, P., Galotti, D.M., Marx, K.A., Kumar, J., Tripathy, S. and Kaplan, D.L., “Oriented Fluorescent Streptavidin Conjugated Phycoerythrin Protein on Biotinylated Lipid L;B Monolayer Films,” in Proteins Structure, Dynamics and Design (Renugopalakrishnan, V., Carey, P.R., Smith, I.C.P., Huang, S.-G. and Storer, A.C., eds.) Escom Science Publishers BV, Leiden, Netherlands, 160164 (1991).Google Scholar
2. Samuelson, L.A., Miller, P., Galotti, D.M., Marx, K.A., Kumar, J., Tripathy, S. and Kaplan, D.L., “The Monomolecular Organization of a Photodynamic Protein System Through Specific Surface Recognition of Streptavidin to Biotinylated LB Films,” Langmuir, 8, 604608 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Samuelson, L.A., Yang, Y., Marx, K.A., Kumar, J., Tripathy, S.K. and Kaplan, D.L., “Surface Specific Monolayer Attachment of a Photodynamic Protein Through Biotin;Streptavidin Complexation: Demonstration of a Cassette Approach,” Biomimetics, 1(1), 5161 (1992).Google Scholar
4. Kamath, M., Lim, J.O., Chittibabu, K.G., Sarma, R., Samuelson, L.A., Akkara, J.A., Kaplan, D.L., Kumar, J., Marx, K.A. and Tripathy, S.K., “Biotinylated Poly(3;Hexylthiophene;co;3; Methanolthiophene); A Langmuir Monolayer Forming Copolymer,” J. Macromol. Sci. A – Pure Appl. Chem., 30(8), 493 (1993).Google Scholar
5. Kamath, M., Chittibabu, K.G., Lim, J.O., Marx, K.A., Kumar, J., Tripathy, S,K., Samuelson, L.A. and Kaplan, D.L., “A Long Spacer Group Biotinylated Thiophene Copolymer; A Novel Biomaterial for LB Film Assembly,” submitted to MRS proceedings (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Lim, J.O., Kamath, M., Marx, K.A., Tripathy, S.K., Kaplan, D.L. and Samuelson, L.A., “Biotinylated Polythiophene Copolymer; A Novel Electroactive Biomaterial Utilizing the Biotin; Streptavidin Interaction,” Biomolecular Materials, 292, 141 (1993).Google Scholar
7. Samuelson, L.A., Lim, J.O., Kamath, M., Marx, K.A., Tripathy, S.K. and Kaplan, D.L., “The Coupling of a Thiophene Copolymer to a Photoreactive Antennae Protein Using Biotin/Streptavidin Complexation,” Polymer Preprints, 34(2) (Proceedings ACS Award Symposium Chicago), 759760 (1993).Google Scholar
8. Samuelson, L.A., Lim, J.O., Kamath, M., Marx, K.A., Tripathy, S.K. and Kaplan, D.L.,”Molecular Recognition Between a Biotinylated Polythiophene Copolymer and Phycoerythrin Utilizing the Biotin;Streptavidin Interaction,” Thin Solid Films (in press, 1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Marx, K.A., Minehan, D.S., Lim, J.O., Pande, R., Kamath, M., Tripathy, S.K. and Kaplan, D.L.,”Intelligent Materials Properties of DNA and Strategies for Its Incorporation into Electroactive Polymeric Thin Film Systems” submitted to J. Intel. Matis. Sys. Struct. (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Samuelson, L.A., Sengupta, S., Wiley, B., Lim, J.O., Cazeca, M., Kumar, J., Marx, K., Tripathy, S.K. and Kaplan, D.L., “Intelligent Systems Based on Ordered Arrays of Biological Molecules Using the LB Technique”submitted to J. Intel. Matis. Sys. Struct. (1993).Google Scholar
11. Ayyagari, M., Gao, H., Bihari, B., Chittibabu, K.G., Kumar, J., Marx, K.A., Kaplan, D.L. and Tripathy, S.K.,”Molecular self assembly on optical fiber;based fluorescence sensor,” SPIE Meeting Proceeding, (in press, Fall 1993).Google Scholar
12. Ayyagari, M. et al., “A Technique for Rapid and Sensitive Detection and Quantification of Organophosphate Based Insecticides”, manuscript in preparation.Google Scholar
13. Webb, J. L. Enzyme and Metabolic Inhibitors Vol 1, Academic Press, New York, NY (1963).Google Scholar
14. I.H., Segel Enzyme Kinetics, Behaviour and Analysis of Rapid Equlibrium and Steady State Enzyme Systems, John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY (1975).Google Scholar
15. Merck Index, 10th Ed., p 5525 (1983).Google Scholar
16. G., Palleschi; M., Bemabie; C., Cremisini; M., MasciniDetermination of organophosphorus insecticides with a choline electrochemical biosensor,” Sensors and Actuators B, 7, 513517 (1992)Google Scholar
17. W., Trettnak; F., Reininger; E., Zinterl; O.S., WolfbeisFiber;optic remote detection of pesticides and related inhibitors of the enzyme acetylcholine esterase,” Sensors and Actuators B, 11, 8793 (1993).Google Scholar
18. S.R., Caldwell; R.M., RaushelDetoxification of organophosphate pesticides using an immobilized phosphotriesterase from Pseudomonas diminuta ,” Biotechnol. Bioeng., 37, 103109 (1991).Google Scholar
19. D.P., Dumas; H.D., Durst; W.G., Landis; F.M., Raushel; J.R., WildInactivation of organophosphorus nerve agents by the phosphotriesterase from Pseudomonas diminuta,” Arch.Biochem. Biophys., 277, 155159 (1990).Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Interfacing Conducting Polymers and Biological Macromolecules: A Case Study of Insecticide Biosensor Development
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Interfacing Conducting Polymers and Biological Macromolecules: A Case Study of Insecticide Biosensor Development
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Interfacing Conducting Polymers and Biological Macromolecules: A Case Study of Insecticide Biosensor Development
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *