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In-Situ Observation of Oxide Monolayer Formation on Copper Solid-Liquid Interfaces

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

John R. Lagraff
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Materials Research Laboratory, The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801
Brandon J. Cruickshank
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Materials Research Laboratory, The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801
Andrew A. Gewirth
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Materials Research Laboratory, The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801
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Abstract

It is extremely important to characterize the various bare copper surfaces in situ before any subsequent corrosion or deposition chemistry can be understood. In this paper, in situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to image the low-index faces of Cu single crystals in H2SO4 and HClO4 acidic solutions. Cu(100) surfaces exhibited potential-dependent c(2x2) adlayers in pH=1 solutions which were attributed to oxide (or hydroxide) overlayers. Images of Cu(1 10) obtained in pH 2.5-2.7 solutions revealed the growth of primarily [001] oriented (nxl) adlayer chain structures, where n is an integer. Preliminary measurements on Cu(111) did not reveal any adlayer structures between pH's of 1-3. The oxide monolayers on Cu(100) and Cu(110) crystals were observed in the thermodynamically forbidden region of the pH-potential phase diagram, which indicates that stable oxide adlayers develop prior to bulk oxide formation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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References

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In-Situ Observation of Oxide Monolayer Formation on Copper Solid-Liquid Interfaces
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