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In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Study of Strain-Induced Martensite Formation in 304L Stainless Steel at a Cryogenic Temperature

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Kaixiang Tao
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996
James J. Wall
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996
Donald W. Brown
Affiliation:
MST-8, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545
Hongqi Li
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996
Sven C. Vogel
Affiliation:
LANSCE-12, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545
Mark A. M. Bourke
Affiliation:
MST-8, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545
Hahn Choo
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831
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Abstract

In-situ, time-of-flight neutron diffraction was performed to investigate the martensitic phase transformation during quasi-static uniaxial compression testing of 304L stainless steel at 300K (room temperature) and 203K. In-situ neutron diffraction study enabled the bulk measurement of intensity evolution for each hkl atomic plane during the austenite (fcc) to martensite (hcp and bcc) phase transformation. The neutron diffraction patterns show that the martensite phases started to develop at about 2.5% applied strain (600 MPa applied stress) at 203K. However, at 300K, the martensite formation was not observed throughout the test. Furthermore, from changes in the relative intensities of individual hkl atomic planes, the selective phase transformation can be well understood and the grain orientation relationship between the austenite and newly-forming martensite phases can be determined. The results show that the fcc grain families with {111} and {200} plane normals parallel to the loading axis are favored for the “fcc to hcp” and “fcc to bcc” transformations, respectively.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Study of Strain-Induced Martensite Formation in 304L Stainless Steel at a Cryogenic Temperature
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In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Study of Strain-Induced Martensite Formation in 304L Stainless Steel at a Cryogenic Temperature
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In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Study of Strain-Induced Martensite Formation in 304L Stainless Steel at a Cryogenic Temperature
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