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Infrared Properties of Thin Pt/Al2O3 Granular Metal-Insulator Composite Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

M. F. MacMillan
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh, Department of Physics and Astronomy 100 Allen Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15260
R. P. Devaty
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh, Department of Physics and Astronomy 100 Allen Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15260
J. V. Mantese
Affiliation:
General Motors Research Laboratories, Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Warren, MI 48090
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Abstract

The reflection of mid- and near-infrared radiation (400-15000 cm−1 by thin Pt/Al2O3 cermet films was measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer. The data were compared with predictions of three models for the effective optical constants of heterogeneous materials: Maxwell-Garnett, Bruggeman, and a simplified version of a probabilistic growth model due to Sheng. Sheng's model provides the best description of the data over the complete range of metallic volume fraction. This result is expected based on the most likely topology of the films and is in agreement with other work on similar systems at higher frequencies.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1989

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References

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