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Influence of the Implanted Species on the Residual Damage After Hot Implants in Silicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

L. Calcagno
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Fisica, Corso Italia 57-95129 Catania (Italy)
C. Spinella
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Fisica, Corso Italia 57-95129 Catania (Italy)
M. Catania
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Fisica, Corso Italia 57-95129 Catania (Italy)
S. U. Campisano
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Fisica, Corso Italia 57-95129 Catania (Italy)
G. Foti
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Fisica, Corso Italia 57-95129 Catania (Italy)
G. Ferla
Affiliation:
SGS-Thompson, Stradale Primosole 50-95100 Catania (Italy)
E. Rimini
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Fisica, Corso Italia 57-95129 Catania (Italy)
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Abstract

Damage formation during hot implants of 600 keV As or Ge ions into Si was investigated by changing the target temperature (>150 °C) and the ion fluence. The defect distributions, as obtained by channeling analysis, are characterized by a gaussian shape whose maximum coincide with the peak of the energy density deposition and with a width of 200 nm. The amount of damage is a factor of two higher for Ge than for As ion implants, and a similar result was found for the damage created by Ge implants into bare Si or Si doped with a near constant As concentration of 2×10 20/cm3. The transition to amorphous formation is quite sharp for As (around 120 °C) and quite broad for Ge implants. The different amount and kind of extended defects is probably due to an interaction of the mobile point defects, vacancies and interstitials, with As. The interaction probably increases the defects annihilation rate.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1989

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References

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