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In Situ FT-IR Studies of Oxide and Oxynitride Sol-Gel-Derived Thin Films*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

David M. Haaland
Affiliation:
Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185
C. Jeffrey Brinker
Affiliation:
Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185
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Abstract

A high-temperature infrared cell was developed to study the gel-to-glass conversion of sol-gel-derived thin films. FT-IR spectra of matched thin-film borosilicate sol-gel samples were taken as the samples were heated at 100°C intervals to 700°C in either air or ammonia. The gels were converted to oxide and oxynitride glasses, respectively, by these heat treatments. The gel-to-glass conversion could be followed and compared for these two treatments by monitoring changes in the vibrational bands present in the spectra. Comparisons between the infrared spectra of NH3-treated and air-treated films heated above 500°C reveal the appearance of new B-N bonds at the expense of B-O-Si bonds for the NH3-fired films. These spectra also exhibit changes which may indicate the formation of Si-N bonds. Thus, ammonolysis reactions can result in thin-film oxynitride glass formation at relatively low temperatures.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1984

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Footnotes

*

This work performed at Sandia National Laboratories supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract Number DE-AC04-76DP00789.

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