Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78bd46657c-9sqjz Total loading time: 0.447 Render date: 2021-05-05T23:02:02.821Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Improved Quality of Bulk II-VI Substrates for HgcdTe and HgZnTe Epitaxy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Sanghamitra Sen
Affiliation:
Santa Barbara Research Center, 75 Coromar Drive, Goleta, CA 93117
John E. Stannard
Affiliation:
Santa Barbara Research Center, 75 Coromar Drive, Goleta, CA 93117
Get access

Abstract

Single crystals of CdTe or dilute alloys of Cd1−yZnyTe (y≤0.04) and CdTe1−zSez (z ≤0.04) with low defect density, high purity and large single-crystal area (>30 cm2) are required as substrates for high-quality epitaxial Hg1−xCdxTe thin films in the infrared (IR) detector industry. Bridgman or gradient freeze is the most common technique used for commercial production of these materials because of its success in producing large area substrates of good quality and reproducibility. For epitaxial growth of Hg1−xZnxTe, which has been of considerable interest in recent years as an IR detector material, the substrate of choice has been Cd0.80Zn0.20Te, for lattice matching with long wavelength Hg1−xZnxTe epitaxial layers (x = 0.13–0.14). The primary focus of this paper is on CdZnTe which is currently the preferred substrate material and most widely used for both HgCdTe and HgZnTe epitaxy. This paper reviews the current status of bulk substrate technology for IR detector applications, highlighting critical issues and essential research areas for further improvement of these materials.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Final Report, Manufacturing Technology for HgCdTe Focal Plane Arrays, USAF, WL Contract No. F33615-86-C-5006 (19871991).Google Scholar
2. Tung, T., DeArmond, L. V., Herald, R. F., Kalisher, M. H., Olson, D. A., Risser, R. F., Stevens, A. P., and Tighe, S. J., SPIE Conf. Proc. 1735, SPIE Int. Sympos. on Opt. Appl. Sci. and Engr., San Diego, July 1992.Google Scholar
3. Cockrum, C. A., Gesswein, F. I., Rosbeck, J. P., and Taylor, S. M., Proc. IRIS Detector Specialty Meeting, Aug. 1991.Google Scholar
4. Bell, S. L. and Sen, S., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 3 (1), 112 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Sen, S., Johnson, S. M., Kiele, J. A., Konkel, W. H. and Stannard, J. E., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc., Vol.161, P. 3 (1991).Google Scholar
6. McDevitt, S., John, D. R., Sepich, J. L., Bowers, K. A., Schetzina, J. F., Rai, R. S. and Mahajan, S., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc., Vol.161, P. 15 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Johnson, S. M., Rhiger, D. R., Rosbeck, J. P., Peterson, J. M., Taylor, S. M., and Boyd, M. E., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 10, 1499 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Sen, S., Konkel, W. H., Tighe, S. J., Bland, L. G., Sharma, S. R., and Taylor, R. E., J. Crystal Growth 86, 111, (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. NEVADA Software Package, User's Manual, Turner Associates, P. O. Box 426, Brea, California.Google Scholar
10. Nakagawa, K., Maeda, K. and Takeuchi, S., Appl. Phys. Letters 34, 574, (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Vydyanath, H. R., Ellsworth, J., Kennedy, J. J., Dean, B., Johnson, C. J., Neugebauer, G. T., Sepich, J., and Liao, P., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 10(4), 1476, (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Azoulay, M., Rotter, S., Gafni, G., Tenne, R., and Roth, M., J. Crystal Growth 117,276,(1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Yokota, K., Yoshikawa, T., Inano, S., Morioka, T., and Katayama, S., Appl. Phys. Lett. 56 (9),866, (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Mozer, W. E., and Comtois, R. R., Paper presented at 1992 Workshop on Measurement Techniques For Characterization Of HgCdTe Materials, Processing, And Detectors, October 15–16, 1992, Danvers, Massachusetts.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Improved Quality of Bulk II-VI Substrates for HgcdTe and HgZnTe Epitaxy
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Improved Quality of Bulk II-VI Substrates for HgcdTe and HgZnTe Epitaxy
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Improved Quality of Bulk II-VI Substrates for HgcdTe and HgZnTe Epitaxy
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *