Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-2jsqd Total loading time: 0.163 Render date: 2021-06-19T16:49:50.072Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Hydrogen-Vacancy Effects in Pu-2 at. % Ga Alloys

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 June 2012

Daniel S. Schwartz
Affiliation:
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA
Scott Richmond
Affiliation:
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA
Alice I. Smith
Affiliation:
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA
Alison Costello
Affiliation:
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA
Christopher D. Taylor
Affiliation:
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA
Get access

Abstract

Plutonium and Pu-Ga alloys have been observed to have anomalous hydrogen solubility behavior, including a significant concentration dependence of hydrogen diffusivity in the dilute regime, a sharp drop off in the hydrogen solubility constant in the dilute regime, and a near complete absence of change in the Sieverts’ constant as the alloys are heated across phase transformation boundaries. We are investigating the possibility that a vacancy mechanism is responsible for this behavior. X-ray diffraction measurements show a 0.14% lattice contraction in Pu-2 at. % Ga alloys when they are charged with ~2 at. % hydrogen. The lattice re-expands when the hydrogen is removed. Density functional calculations show that increasing the number of hydrogen atoms associated with a vacant lattice site in Pu lowers the energy of the hydrogen-vacancy complex. These observations support the idea that vacancies are stabilized by hydrogen in the Pu lattice well beyond their thermal equilibrium concentration and could be responsible for the anomalous hydrogen response of Pu.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

[1] Richmond, S., Bridgewater, J. S., Ward, J. W. and Allen, T. H., IOP Conf. Series: Materials Science and Engineering 9 (2010) 012036.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[2] Fukai, Y., J. Alloys and Compounds, 356357 (2003) 263269.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[3] Allen, T. H., Thesis, M.S., Colorado, U., Denver (1991)Google Scholar
[4] Condit, R. H., Krueger, R. L., and Thayer, W. L., Lawrence Livermore Nat. Lab., personal communication to T. H. Allen (ibid.), (1990).Google Scholar
[5] Eshelby, J. D., J. App. Phys., 25 (1954) 255261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[6] Simmons, R. O., Balluffi, R. W., Phys. Rev. 117 (1960) 5261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[7] Söderlind, P., Landa, A., Sadigh, B., Vitos, L. and Ruban, A., Phys. Rev. B 70, (2004) 144103144107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Hydrogen-Vacancy Effects in Pu-2 at. % Ga Alloys
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Hydrogen-Vacancy Effects in Pu-2 at. % Ga Alloys
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Hydrogen-Vacancy Effects in Pu-2 at. % Ga Alloys
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *