Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-8r4lv Total loading time: 0.595 Render date: 2021-08-05T18:50:12.617Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Hydrogen Induced Defects at Silicon Surfaces and Buried Epitaxial Misfit Dislocation Interfaces

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

Tian-Qun Zhou
Affiliation:
Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7916
Zbigniew Radzimski
Affiliation:
Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7916
Zhigang Xiao
Affiliation:
Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7916
Bhushan Sopori
Affiliation:
Solar Energy Research Institute, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401
George A. Rozgonyi
Affiliation:
Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7916
Get access

Abstract

A silicon epitaxial structure containing spatially confined arrays of misfit dislocations has been used in order to investigate the interaction between hydrogen and individual extended defects. Hydrogen was introduced using a Kaufman plasma ion beam source. A characteristic Si-H peak at 2100 cm-1 was obtained using multiple internal reflection infrared spectrophotometry. Microdefects such as gas bubbles and {111} planar defects were found near the surface, as well as at the misfit dislocation interfaces, using transmission electron microscopy. A heavily damaged region was obtained on the top Si surface and an extended area SEM/EBIC contrast was obtained due to a surface electrical field.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1 Johnson, N. M. and Moyer, M. D., Appl. Phys. Lett. 46, 787 (1985); 48, 709 (1986); R. Singh and S. Fonash, 49, 800 (1986); M. Stutzman, 52, 1667 (1988)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2 Hanoka, J. et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 42, 618 (1983); A. Rohatgi et al., 59, 4167 (1986)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3 Hanoka, J., Hydrogen in Disordered and Amorphous Solid, edited by Bambakidis, G., (1986) pp.81 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4 Muller, J. et al. , Rev. Phys. Appl. 22, 649 (1987)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5 Ponce, F. A. et al. , Inst. Phys. Conf. Ser. 87, 49 (1987)Google Scholar
6 Jeng, S.J., Oehrleih, G. and Scilla, G., Appl. Phys. Lett. 53, 1735 (1988)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7 Rozgonyi, G. A. et al. , J. Cryst. Growth, 85, 300 (1987)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8 Salih, A. et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 46, 419 (1985); D.M. Lee, J. Posthill and G. Rozgonyi, 53, 370 (1988)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9 Bean, Kenneth, IEEE Trans, on Electron Devices, ED–25, 70 (1978)Google Scholar
10 Olsen, J. and Shimura, F., Appl.Phys. Lett. 53, 1934 (1988)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Hydrogen Induced Defects at Silicon Surfaces and Buried Epitaxial Misfit Dislocation Interfaces
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Hydrogen Induced Defects at Silicon Surfaces and Buried Epitaxial Misfit Dislocation Interfaces
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Hydrogen Induced Defects at Silicon Surfaces and Buried Epitaxial Misfit Dislocation Interfaces
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *