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Hot-die Forging of a β-stabilized γ-TiAl Based Alloy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 August 2018

Wilfried Wallgram
Affiliation:
Bohler Schmiedetechnik GmbH & CoKG, Kapfenberg, Austria
Helmut Clemens
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Leoben, Austria
Sascha Kremmer
Affiliation:
Bohler Schmiedetechnik GmbH & CoKG, Kapfenberg, Austria
Andreas Otto
Affiliation:
GfE Metalle und Materialien GmbH, Nuremberg, Germany
Volker Güther
Affiliation:
GfE Metalle und Materialien GmbH, Nuremberg, Germany
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Abstract

Because of the small “deformation window” hot-working of γ-TiAl alloys is a complex and difficult task and, therefore, isothermal forming processes are favoured. In order to increase the deformation window a novel Nb and Mo containing γ-TiAl based alloy (TNM alloy) was developed. Due to a high volume fraction of β-phase at elevated temperatures the alloy can be hot-die forged under near conventional conditions, which means that conventional forging equipment with minor and inexpensive modifications can be used. With subsequent heattreatments balanced mechanical properties can be achieved. This paper summarizes our progress in establishing a “near conventional” forging route for the fabrication of γ-TiAl components. The results of lab scale compression tests and forging trials on an industrial scale are included. In addition, the mechanical properties of forged and heat-treated TNM material are presented.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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