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Honeycomb Films of Biodegradable Polymers for Tissue Engineering

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Takehiro Nishikawa
Affiliation:
Spatio-Temporal Function Materials Research Group, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, JAPAN.
Keiko Arai
Affiliation:
Spatio-Temporal Function Materials Research Group, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, JAPAN.
Junko Hayashi
Affiliation:
Spatio-Temporal Function Materials Research Group, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, JAPAN.
Masahiko Hara
Affiliation:
Spatio-Temporal Function Materials Research Group, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, JAPAN.
Masatsugu Shimomura
Affiliation:
Spatio-Temporal Function Materials Research Group, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, JAPAN.
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Abstract

We report that microporous films (honeycomb films) can lead various types of cells to tissue formation. The honeycomb films were fabricated by applying a moist air to a spread polymer solution containing biodegradable polymers (poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL)) and an amphiphilic polymer. Hepatocytes were cultured on a self-supporting honeycomb film of PLLA. The hepatocytes formed a single layer of columnar shape cells with a thickness of 20 μm. The tissue formation of hepatocytes specifically occurred on the honeycomb film of PLLA, not on a flat film of PLLA. Three dimensional tissue structures were formed, when cells were cultured on both sides of the self-supporting honeycomb film. Double layers of hepatocytes were obtained by the method. Striated tissues such as heart and blood vessel could be reconstructed by utilizing a stretched honeycomb film of PCL.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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References

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