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High Electron Mobility SiGe/Si Transistor Structures on Sapphire Substrates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Samuel A. Alterovitz
Affiliation:
NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135, USA
Carl H. Mueller
Affiliation:
Analex Corporation, Cleveland, OH 44135, USA
Edward T. Croke
Affiliation:
HRL Laboratories LLC, Malibu, CA USA 90265
George E. Ponchak
Affiliation:
NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135, USA
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Abstract

SiGe/Si n-type modulation doped field effect structures and transistors (n-MODFETs) have been fabricated on r-plane sapphire substrates. The structures were deposited using molecular beam epitaxy, and antimony dopants were incorporated via a delta doping process. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) indicates that the peak antimony concentration was approximately 4×1019 cm−3. The electron mobility was over 1,200 and 13,000 cm2/V-sec at room temperature and 0.25 K, respectively. At these two temperatures, the electron carrier densities were 1.6 and 1.33×1012 cm−2, thus demonstrating that carrier confinement was excellent. Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations were observed at 0.25 K, thus confirming the two-dimensional nature of the carriers. Transistors, with gate lengths varying from 1 micron to 5 microns, were fabricated using these structures and dc characterization was performed at room temperature. The saturated drain current region extended over a wide source-to-drain voltage (VDS) range, with VDS knee voltages of approximately 0.5 V and increased leakage starting at voltages slightly higher than 4 V.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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