Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-nq4kt Total loading time: 0.393 Render date: 2021-06-13T03:36:17.027Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

High Conductivity Gate Metallurgy for Tft/Lcd's

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Peter M. Fryer
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
E. Colgan
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
E. Galligan
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
W. Graham
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
R. Horton
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
L. Jenkins
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
R. John
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
Y. Kuo
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
K. Latzko
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
F. Libsch
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
A. Lien
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
R. Nywening
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
R. Polastre
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
M. E. Rothwell
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
J. Wilson
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
R. Wisnieff
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
S. Wright
Affiliation:
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
Get access

Abstract

Amorphous silicon based thin film transistor liquid crystal displays (TFT/LCD) have become the dominant technology used for flat panel displays for notebook computers. The need for higher resolution, larger diagonal displays for both notebook and desktop applications is discussed. Calculations have shown that the use of high conductivity gate metal such as aluminum or copper, together with the implementation of improved groundrules, can significantly extend today's technology. Aluminum suffers from problems with hillock formation during PECVD processing, and copper typically has poor adhesion to glass, reaction problems with silicon and other PECVD films, and difficulties in contacting it to other metals. Approaches to solving problems with both materials are presented, and a novel reduced mask process to fabricate high resolution, high aperture ratio 10.5” SXGA (1280×1024) displays is described. The process uses copper gate metallurgy with redundancy, without the need for extra processing steps. The resulting displays have 150 dpi color resolution, an aperture ratio of over 35%, and excellent image quality, making them the first high resolution displays that are suitable for notebook applications.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1 Wisnieff, R., “Numerical Simulation for Large-Area TFT-LCD's,” Proc. of SID, Vol. XXIV, 1993, pp.731734.Google Scholar
2 Trube, J., Ocker, B., Bender, M., “Evaluation of Target Composition for Hillock-Free Aluminum Sputtering,” Proceedings of DisplayWorks 1998, pp. 6970.Google Scholar
3 Fryer, Peter M., “A High Resolution Copper Gate TFT/ Process,” Conference Record of the 1994 International Display Research Conference, pp. 146149.Google Scholar
4 Fryer, Peter M. et. al, “A Six Mask TFT-LCD Process Using Copper -Gate Metallurgy,” Journal of the Society for Information Display, Volume 5, Number 1, pp. 333336.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

High Conductivity Gate Metallurgy for Tft/Lcd's
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

High Conductivity Gate Metallurgy for Tft/Lcd's
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

High Conductivity Gate Metallurgy for Tft/Lcd's
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *