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Heavy Metal Removal from Electroplating Wastewater Using Acacia Cellulose Based Polymeric Chelating Ligand

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Lutfor Rahman
Affiliation:
lutfor73@gmail.comlutrinl@hotmail.com, University Malaysia Pahang, FIST, Kuantan, Malaysia
Simon Siew Yong Wen
Affiliation:
simonssyw@yahoo.com, University Malaysia Sabah, SST, Kota Kinablu, Sabah, Malaysia
Wong Hai Fatt
Affiliation:
wonghaifatt@gmail.com, University Malaysia Sabah, SST, Kota Kinablu, Sabah, Malaysia
Sazmal Effendi Bin Arshad
Affiliation:
sazmal@ums.edu.my, University Malaysia Sabah, SST, Kota Kinablu, Sabah, Malaysia
Baba Musta
Affiliation:
babamus@ums.edu.my, University Malaysia Sabah, SST, Kota Kinablu, Sabah, Malaysia
Mohd Harun Abdullah
Affiliation:
harunabd@ums.edu.my, University Malaysia Sabah, SST, Kota Kinablu, Sabah, Malaysia
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Abstract

A polymeric chelating ligand containing hydroxamic acid and amidoxime functional groups were prepared from acrylate polymer grafted acacia cellulose and this ligand was introduced to remove heavy metals from industrial wastewaters. The heavy metals binding property with this ligand is excellent up to 3.78 mmol/ g sorbent and the rate of exchange of some metals was very fast i.e. t½ ≈ 6 min (average). Two types of wastewater from electroplating plants used in this study those containing chromium, zinc, nickel, copper and iron etc. Before removing heavy metals from wastewater, pH was adjusted to 4 and various metal concentrations were used for finding the extraction capability of the ligand. It was found that the metals recovery was highly efficient, up to 99.99% of several heavy metals were removed from electroplating wastewater using the ligands. Therefore, the proposed polymeric chelating ligands could be used to the remove such heavy metals from industrial wastewater and as well as effective ligands for environment protection.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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Heavy Metal Removal from Electroplating Wastewater Using Acacia Cellulose Based Polymeric Chelating Ligand
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