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Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Matthew R. Maschmann
Affiliation:
Purdue University, School of Mechanical Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, West Lafayette, Indiana 47904
Amit Goyal
Affiliation:
New Jersey Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Newark, New Jersey 07102
Zafar Iqbal
Affiliation:
New Jersey Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Newark, New Jersey 07102
Timothy S. Fisher
Affiliation:
Purdue University, School of Mechanical Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, West Lafayette, Indiana 47904
Roy Gat
Affiliation:
Sekitechnotron USA, 1153 Bordeaux Dr #102, Sunnyvale, California 94089
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Abstract

Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been grown for the first time by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 800°C using methane as the precursor and bimetallic Mo/Co catalyst supported on MgO dispersed on a silicon wafer. The nanotubes grown consist of bundles, each composed of individual tubes of a single diameter associated with either metallic or semiconducting SWCNTs, based on characterization by Raman spectroscopy. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy show that the bundles are relatively thin – 5 to 10 nm in diameter – and up to a few micrometers in length. The results are compared with those obtained on recently reported SWCNTs grown by radio frequency PECVD.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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