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Growth of GaN by Sublimation Technique and Homoepitaxial Growth by MOCVD

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Shiro Sakai
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Tokushima, Minami-josanjima, Tokushima 770, Japan
Satoshi Kurai
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Tokushima, Minami-josanjima, Tokushima 770, Japan
Katsushi Nishino
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Tokushima, Minami-josanjima, Tokushima 770, Japan
Koichi Wada
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Tokushima, Minami-josanjima, Tokushima 770, Japan
Hisao Sato
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Tokushima, Minami-josanjima, Tokushima 770, Japan
Yoshiki Naoi
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Tokushima, Minami-josanjima, Tokushima 770, Japan
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Abstract

The growth of bulk GaN by sublimation method and a homoepitaxial growth by MOCVD are reported. A photo-pumped stimulated emission is obtained from a homoepitaxial layer. The source powder used as a source in the sublimation method is investigated in detail, and it is shown that the powder contains many kinds of compounds consisting mainly of gallium, nitrogen and hydrogen. Growth nucleation control is performed by partly covering an MOCVD-GaN or a scratched-sapphire (0001) by Si02. Hexagonal columns of the size of about 200 μm in diameter and about 200 μm in height are selectively and uniformly grown at the window sites. This technique enables the device processing of crystallites and also helps to increase crystal size by increasing growth time, since it prevents the nucleation of new crystallites which work as sink of the growing species.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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References

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