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Growth Mechanism and Dislocation Characterization of Silicon Carbide Epitaxial Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Yi Chen
Affiliation:
yichen1@ic.sunysb.edu, Stony Brook University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook, NY, 11794-2275, United States
Hui Chen
Affiliation:
huichen@ic.sunysb.edu, Stony Brook University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook, NY, 11794-2275, United States
William M Vetter
Affiliation:
wvetter@ms.cc.sunysb.edu, Stony Brook University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook, NY, 11794-2275, United States
Hui Zhang
Affiliation:
hui.zhang@sunysb.edu, Stony Brook University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stony Brook, NY, 11794-2300, United States
Michael Dudley
Affiliation:
mdudley@notes.cc.sunysb.edu, Stony Brook University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook, NY, 11794-2275, United States
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Abstract

SiC homo-epitaxial layers were grown in a chemical vapor deposition process using silicon tetrachloride and propane precursors with hydrogen as a carrier gas. Growth rates were found to increase as temperatures increased at high carrier gas flow rate, while at lower carrier gas flow rate growth rates were observed to decrease as temperature increased. Based on the equilibrium model, “thermodynamically controlled growth” accounts for the growth rate reduction. The grown epitaxial layers were characterized using various techniques. Reduction in the threading screw dislocation (SD) density in the epilayers was observed. Suitable models were developed for explaining the reduction in the screw dislocation density as well as the conversion of basal plane dislocations (BPD) into threading edge dislocations (TED).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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