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Growth and Magnetic Anisotropy of Polycrystalline (110) (NiFe/Ni/NiFe)/Cu Multilayer on 4 ° TILT-CUT Si(111)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Yong-Jin Song
Affiliation:
Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56–1 Shillim- dong Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151–742, South Korea
Byung-Il Lee
Affiliation:
Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56–1 Shillim- dong Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151–742, South Korea
Seung-Ki Joo
Affiliation:
Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56–1 Shillim- dong Kwanak-ku, Seoul 151–742, South Korea
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Abstract

[Cu(20Å)/NiFe(7Å)/Ni(6Å)/NiFe(7Å)]10Cu(50Å) multilayers were deposited on 4 ° tilt-cut Si(lll) using 3-gun rf magnetron sputtering system. An in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy was found and the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant was about 3×104 erg/cm3. The multilayers on non tilt-cut Si(lll) with Cu underlayer did not show any anisotropy. The crystal structure of the multilayer on 4 ° tilt-cut Si(111) was studied using TEM work and the magnetic anisotropy is originated from the growth of (110) preferred orientation of the multilayer. When other material such as Ni or NiFe was used as an underlayer for the multilayer, the magnetic anisotropy disappeared and the crystal structure was (111). The multilayer without underlayer did not show any magnetic anisotropy either. It is thought that Cu underlayer was grown with (110) orientation on 4 ° tilt-cut Si(111) through the ledges in Si wafer and worked as a template for the growth of the multilayer.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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References

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