Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-5rzhg Total loading time: 0.297 Render date: 2021-11-30T16:48:16.753Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Gettering by Overpressurized Bubbles Induced by High-Energy-He-Implantation In Silicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Gabrielle Regula
Affiliation:
Laboratoire TECSEN, Aix-Marseille III, Service 151, Marseille, F-13397
Rachid El Bouayadi
Affiliation:
Laboratoire TECSEN, Aix-Marseille III, Service 151, Marseille, F-13397
Bernard Pichaud
Affiliation:
Laboratoire TECSEN, Aix-Marseille III, Service 151, Marseille, F-13397
Sylvie Godey
Affiliation:
CERI-CNRS, 3A, rue de la Férollerie, Orléans cedex, F-45071
Romain Delamare
Affiliation:
CERI-CNRS, 3A, rue de la Férollerie, Orléans cedex, F-45071
Esidor Ntsoenzok
Affiliation:
CERI-CNRS, 3A, rue de la Férollerie, Orléans cedex, F-45071
Anton Van Veen
Affiliation:
IRI, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, JB Delft, NL-2629
Get access

Abstract

Silicon samples were implanted with He ions at 1.6 MeV using doses ranging from 1×1016 cm-2 to 1×1017cm-2 with different fluxes (0.4νA/cm2 - 2.0νA/cm2) and annealed at high (1000°C) and low temperatures (800°C). The implantation induced-defect structure and their distribution in the depth of the sample were studied by cross section electron microscopy (XTEM). An unexpected consequence of the flux on the defect population and density was found solely for 2×1016 cm-2, which is the upper threshold to get nano-bubbles at such large implantation depth. Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) were performed to measure the ratio of He remaining in the bubbles as a function of time and temperature anneal. Some samples were gold or nickel diffused at temperatures ranging from 870°C to 1050°C prior to He implantation. The gettering efficiency of the implantation-induced defects was measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), after a high temperature getter annealing. SIMS profiles exhibit a shape and a width closely related to the presence of the defects (observed by XTEM) which are very efficient sinks for all kinds of metal impurities. The bubbles were found to be more efficient traps than the dislocation loops.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. The National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (Semiconductor Industry Assoc., San Jose, CA) p110 (1994)Google Scholar
2. Petersen, G.A., Myers, S.M. and Follstaedt, D.M., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. in Phys. Res. B 127/128, 301 (1997)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Wong-leung, J., Ascheron, C.E., Petravic, M., Elliman, R.G. and Williams, J.S., Appl. Phys. Lett. 66, 1231 (1995)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Rohr, P., Grob, J.J., Siffert, P., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 80/81 640 (1993)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Mohadjeri, B., Williams, J.S., and Wong-Leung, J., Appl. Phys. Lett. 66 (15) 10 April 1995 ou la publi d'Isa sur h et heCrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Raineri, V., Fallica, P. G., Percolla, G., Battaglia, A., Barbagallo, M., Campisano, S. U., J. Appl. Phys. 78 (1995) 3727 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Griffioen, C. C., Evans, J. H., Jong, P. C. de, Veen, A. Van, Nucl. Inst. Meth. B 27 (1987) 417 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Atalo, M., Puska, M. J., Nieminen, R. M., Phys. Rev. B. 46 12 806 (1992)Google Scholar
9. Allen, W. R., Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 279 433 (1993)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Corni, F., Calzlari, G., Frabboni, S., Nobili, C., Ottaviani, G., Tonini, R., J. Appl. Phys. 85 1401. (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Veen, A. Van, Schut, H., Hakvoort, R. A., Fedorov, A., and Westerduin, K. T., Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 373, 499 (1995)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Raineri, V., Fallica, P.G., Percolla, G., Battaglia, A., Barbagallo, M. and Campisano, S.U., J. Appl. Phys. 78, 3727 (1995)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Follstaedt, D.M., Myers, S.M., Petersen, G.A., and Medernach, J.W., J. Electron. Mater. 25, 157 (1996)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Godey, S., Sauvage, T., Ntsoenzok, E., Erramli, H., Beaufort, M. F., Barbot, J. F., Leroy, B., J. Appl. Phys. 87, 5 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15.P.Fichner, F.P., Kaschny, J.R., Yankov, R.A., Mücklich, A., Kreissig, U. and Skorupa, W., Appl. Phys. Lett. 70, 732 (1997)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Myers, S.M. and Follstaedt, D.M., J. Appl. Phys. 79, 1337 (1996)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17. Mariani-Regula, G., Pichaud, B., Godey, S., Ntsoenzok, E., Perner, O. and bouayadi, R. El, Mat. Sci. and Engineer. B, 71, 203 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18. Bouayadi, R. El, Regula, G., Pichaud, B., Lancin, M., Dubois, C., Ntsoenzok, E., phys. stat. sol. (b) 222, 319 (2000)3.0.CO;2-Q>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19. Regula, G., Bouayadi, R. El, Pichaud, B. and Ntsoenzok, E., Solid State Phenomena Vols. 82-84 pp.355360 (2002)Google Scholar
20. Stolvijk, N.A., Bracht, H., ‘diffusion in silicon, germanium and their alloys’ ed., landot-Börnstein, New Series III/33A p 196.Google Scholar
21. Schröter, W., Seibt, M. and Gilles, D., Materials Science and Technology Eds. Cahn, R.W., Haasen, P. and Kramer, E.J., VHC Weinheim 1991 Vol. 4, (pp 539587)Google Scholar
22. Graff, K., Metal Impurities in Silicon-Device Fabrication, Springer Series in Materials Science, Eds. Queisser, H. J., Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg (1995)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
23. Hauber, J., Stolwijk, N.A., Tapfer, L., Mehrer, H. and Frank, W., J. Phys. C, 19, 5817 (1986)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
24. Donnelly, S. E., Vishnyakov, V. M., Birtcher, R. C., Carter, G., Nucl. Instr. and Meth in Phys. B 175-177 (2001) 132139 CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Gettering by Overpressurized Bubbles Induced by High-Energy-He-Implantation In Silicon
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Gettering by Overpressurized Bubbles Induced by High-Energy-He-Implantation In Silicon
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Gettering by Overpressurized Bubbles Induced by High-Energy-He-Implantation In Silicon
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *