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Fullerene sensitized silicon for near to mid infrared light detection

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 April 2019

Gebhard J. Matt
Affiliation:
Institute for Semiconductor Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria
Mateusz Bednorz
Affiliation:
Institute for Semiconductor Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria
Thomas Fromherz
Affiliation:
Institute for Semiconductor Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria
Saeid Zamiri
Affiliation:
Christian Doppler Laboratory for Surface Optics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria
Christoph Lungenschmied
Affiliation:
Konarka Austria, Linz, Austria
Niyazi Serdar Sariciftci
Affiliation:
Linz Institute for Organic Solar Cells (LIOS), Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria
Günther Bauer
Affiliation:
Institute for Semiconductor Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria
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Abstract

We report on a novel light sensing scheme based on a silicon/fullerene-derivative hetero-junction that allows the realization of optoelectronic devices for the detection of near to mid infrared radiation. Despite the absent absorption of silicon and the fullerene-derivative for wavelengths beyond 1.1 µm and 0.72 µm, respectively, a hetero-junction of these materials absorbs and generates a photo-current due to absorption in the near to mid infrared. This photo-current is caused by an interfacial absorption mechanism [1].

Besides its scientific relevance, the simple fabrication process of the hetero-junction (e.g. the fullerene-derivative is deposited by spin-coating on Si) as well as its compatibility with the established and rather cheap CMOS technology makes the presented hybrid approach a promising candidate for widespread applications.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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References

[1] Matt, G. J., Fromherz, T., Bednorz, M., Zamiri, S., Goncalves, G., Lungenschmied, C., Meissner, D., Sitter, H., Sariciftci, N. S., Brabec, C. J., Bauer, G., Adv. Mat. 22, 647 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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