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Fracture Patterns of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 April 2013

Eric Perim
Affiliation:
Instituto de Física ‘Gleb Wataghin’, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
Ricardo Paupitz Santos
Affiliation:
Departamento de Física, IGCE, Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP, Brazil.
Pedro Alves da Silva Autreto
Affiliation:
Instituto de Física ‘Gleb Wataghin’, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
Douglas S. Galvao
Affiliation:
Instituto de Física ‘Gleb Wataghin’, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
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Abstract

During the last years carbon-based nanostructures (such as, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene) have been object of intense investigations. The great interest in these nanostructures can be attributed to their remarkable electrical and mechanical properties. Their inorganic equivalent structures do exist and are based on boron nitride (BN) motifs. BN fullerenes, nanotubes and single layers have been already synthesized. Recently, the fracture patterns of single layer graphene and multi-walled carbon nanotubes under stress have been studied by theoretical and experimental methods. In this work we investigated the fracturing process of defective carbon and boron nitride nanotubes under similar stress conditions. We have carried out fully atomistic molecular reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF force field. The similarities and differences between carbon and boron nitride fracture patterns are addressed.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013

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