Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-6tv95 Total loading time: 3.244 Render date: 2021-05-13T20:27:47.602Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Formation of Nanovoids and Nanocolumns in High Dose Hydrogen Implanted ZnO Bulk Crystals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Rajendra Singh
Affiliation:
rsingh@mpi-halle.de, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Exp. Deptt. 2, Weinberg 2, Halle, 06120, Germany, 0049-345-5582546, 0049-345-5511223
R. Scholz
Affiliation:
roscholz@mpi-halle.de, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, Halle, 06120, Germany
U. Gösele
Affiliation:
goesele@mpi-halle.de, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, Halle, 06120, Germany
S. H. Christiansen
Affiliation:
christiansen@mpi-halle.de, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, Halle, 06120, Germany
Get access

Abstract

ZnO(0001) bulk crystals were implanted with 100 keV H2 + ions with various doses in the range of 5×1016 to 3×1017 cm-2. The ZnO crystals implanted up to a dose of 2.2×1017 cm-2 did not show any surface exfoliation, even after post-implantation annealing at temperatures up to 800°C for 1 h while those crystals implanted with a dose of 2.8×1017 cm-2 or higher exhibited exfoliated surfaces already in the as-implanted state. In a narrow dose window in between, controlled exfoliation could be obtained upon post-implantation annealing only. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) of the implanted ZnO samples showed that a large number of nanovoids were formed within the implantation-induced damage band. These nanovoids served as precursors for the formation of microcracks leading to the exfoliation of ZnO wafer surfaces. In addition to the nanovoids, elongated nanocolumns perpendicular to the ZnO wafer surfaces were also observed. These nanocolumns showed diameters of up to 10 nm and lengths of up to 500 nm. The nanocolumns were found in the ZnO wafer even well beyond the projected range of hydrogen ions.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Look, D. C., Mater. Sci. Eng. B 80, 381 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Özgür, Ü., Alivov, Y. I., Liu, C., Teke, A., Reshchikov, M. A., Dogan, S., Avrutin, V., Cho, S. J., and Morkoc, H., J. Appl. Phys. 98, 041301 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Namkoong, G., Burnham, S., Lee, K.-K., Trybus, E., Doolittle, W. A., Losurdo, M., Capezzuto, P., Bruno, G., Nemeth, B., and Nause, J., Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 184104 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Kobayashi, A., Kawaguchi, Y., Ohta, J., Fujioka, H., Fujiwara, K., and Ishii, A., Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 181907 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Maeda, K., Sato, M., Niikura, I., and Fukuda, T., Semicond. Sci. Technol. 20, S49 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Nause, J. and Nemeth, B, Semicond. Sci. Technol. 20, S25 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Yasuda, T. and Segawa, Y., Phs. Status Solidi B 241, 676 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Bruel, M., Electron. Lett. 31, 1201 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Tong, Q.-Y. and Gösele, U., Adv. Mater. 11, 1404 (1999).3.0.CO;2-W>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Tong, Q.-Y., Gutjahr, K., Hopfe, S., Gösele, U., and Lee, T. H., Appl. Phys. Lett. 70, 1390 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Siegler, J. F., Biersack, J. P., and Littmark, U., The Stopping and Range of Ions in Solids, Pergamon, New York (1985).Google Scholar
12. Chen, Z. Q., Kawasuso, A., Xu, Y., Naramoto, H., Yuan, X. L., Sekiguchi, T., Suzuki, R., and Ohdaira, T., Phs. Rev. B 71, 115213 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Formation of Nanovoids and Nanocolumns in High Dose Hydrogen Implanted ZnO Bulk Crystals
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Formation of Nanovoids and Nanocolumns in High Dose Hydrogen Implanted ZnO Bulk Crystals
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Formation of Nanovoids and Nanocolumns in High Dose Hydrogen Implanted ZnO Bulk Crystals
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *