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Formation of Hydrogen-passivated Silicon Nanochains by Pulsed Laser Ablation without Thermal Annealing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Mitsuru Inada
Affiliation:
National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Kobe 651–2492, Japan
Ikurou Umezu
Affiliation:
National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Kobe 651–2492, Japan
Shukichi Tanaka
Affiliation:
National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Kobe 651–2492, Japan
Shinro Mashiko
Affiliation:
National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Kobe 651–2492, Japan
Akira Sugimura
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Konan University, Kobe 658–8501, Japan
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Abstract

Hydrogen-passivated silicon nanochains were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of silicon target in hydrogen gas atmosphere at room temperature. When the hydrogen gas pressure was higher than 670Pa, nanochains, which have crystalline silicon core, were formed. Transmission electron microscopy showed the silicon nanochains consist of connections of silicon nanocrystals with mean diameter of 4.6 nm. It is of great interest that the silicon nanochain has crystalline structure without any intentional annealing process. Optical properties of the hydrogen-passivated silicon nanochains were presented.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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Formation of Hydrogen-passivated Silicon Nanochains by Pulsed Laser Ablation without Thermal Annealing
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