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First Evidence of Singlet Oxygen Species Mechanism in Silicate Clay for Antimicrobial Behavior

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 June 2013

Jiun-Chiou Wei
Affiliation:
Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan.
Yi-Ting Wang
Affiliation:
Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan.
Jiang-Jen Lin*
Affiliation:
Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan.
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Abstract

Thin silicate nanoplatelets, derived from the exfoliation of natural Sodium montmorillonite (Na+-MMT) clays, show an unexpected antimicrobial property. A physical trapping mechanism has been proposed because the clay nanoplatelets can indiscriminately inhibit the growth of a broad spectrum of bacteria, including drug-resistant species such as methicillin-resistance S. aureus (MRSA) and silver ion-resistant E. coli. The ability to generate singlet oxygen species was first observed for the clay platelets that showed a high-aspect-ratio geometric shape and the presence of surface ionic charges. By comparison, the pristine clay with a multilayered structure failed to generate any singlet oxygen species. The ability to emit singlet oxygen species provides direct evidence for the antimicrobial ability of clay through a non-chemical mechanism, which opens the potential for medical use.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

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First Evidence of Singlet Oxygen Species Mechanism in Silicate Clay for Antimicrobial Behavior
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