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Fiber Coatings and the Fracture Behavior of a Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

J. H. Miller
Affiliation:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. 0. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831
R. A. Lowden
Affiliation:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. 0. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831
P. K. Liaw
Affiliation:
University of Tennessee, Materials Science and Engineering Department, 434 Dougherty Engineering Building, Knoxville TN 37996-2200
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Abstract

Fiber coatings have been used to modify fiber-matrix interfacial forces, and thus control mechanical properties of continuous fiber ceramic composites. It has been shown that the properties and thickness of the interlayer influence composite properties such as matrix cracking and ultimate strength, toughness and interlaminar shear. The effects of fiber coating properties and thickness on fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites fabricated employing CVI techniques have been examined. Correlations between interface condition, mechanical properties and failure mechanisms have been made.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

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References

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