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FET Characteristic of Chemically-Modified CNT

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Ryotaro Kumashiro
Affiliation:
rkuma@sspns.phys.tohoku.ac.jp, Tohoku Univ., Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, 6-3 Aoba Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8578, Japan, +81-22-795-6468, +81-22-795-6470
Yan Wang
Affiliation:
wan@sspns.phys.tohoku.ac.jp, Tohoku Univ., Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Sendai, Japan
Naoya Komatsu
Affiliation:
komatsu@sspns.phys.tohoku.ac.jp, Tohoku Univ., Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Sendai, Japan
Katsumi Tanigaki
Affiliation:
tani@sspns.phys.tohoku.ac.jp, Tohoku Univ., AIMR-WPI, Sendai, Japan
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Abstract

Electric transport properties of chemically modificated carbon nanotubes (CNT) using Si-containing organic molecules and polymers were investigated by means of the field effect transistors (FET) technique. From the results of FET measurements for each chemically surface modified CNT, it was shown that p-type semiconducting CNT can be converted to n-type ones by physical adsorption of Si-containing organic molecules and polymers having Ph-groups. It is suggested that the electron carrier are doped into CNT from the adsorbed molecules and polymers, and it was also confirmed by the results of adsorption spectra. That is, it can be said that the electronic properties of CNT can be controlled by chemically modifications of outer surface.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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