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Ferroelectric and Ferromagnetic Properties of Co-doped BiFeO3 Thin Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Danilo G Barrionuevo
Affiliation:
danilo_23h@hotmail.comdanilo.barrionuevo@upr.edu, University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez, Physics, PO Box 9000, Mayagüez, Mayagüez, P.R. 00681-9000, Puerto Rico, (787) 832-4040
Surinder P Singh
Affiliation:
surinder.singh@upr.edu, University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez, Engineering science and Materials, Mayaguez, Mayaguez, 00681, Puerto Rico
Ram S Katiyar
Affiliation:
maharajs.tomar@upr.edu, University of Puerto Rico, Department of Physics, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico
Maharaj S. Tomar
Affiliation:
rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu, University of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras, San Juan, Puerto Rico
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Abstract

Materials which possess electrical and magnetic coupling are of great interest for novel devices. Bi(Fe1-xCox)O3 (BFCO) material system was synthesized by solution route for various compositions and thin films were prepared by spin coating on Pt (Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si) substrates. Structural properties of the films were investigated by x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction patterns confirms intense (110) in BiFeO3 and Bi(Fe1-xCox)O3 with rhombohedra distorted perovskite structure without impure phase. Bi(Fe1-xCox)O3 films show week ferroelectric polarization and ferromagnetism at room temperature. Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic coupling could be attributed to the elimination of oxygen vacancies and increased stress in the crystal structure by partial replacement of Fe2+ ion by Co2+ ion.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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