Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-zdbn7 Total loading time: 0.204 Render date: 2022-01-24T20:17:03.285Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Fabrication of Nanoscale Hydrophobic Regions on Anodic Alumina for Selective Adhesion of Biologic Molecules

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Xiefan Lin
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22904
Anthony S. W. Ham
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22904
Natalie A. Villani
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22904
Whye-Kei Lye
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22904
Qiyu Huang
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22904
Michael B. Lawrence
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22904
Brian P. Helmke
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22904
Michael L. Reed
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22904
Get access

Abstract

Studies of selective adhesion of biological molecules provide a path for understanding fundamental cellular properties. A useful technique is to use patterned substrates, where the pattern of interest has the same length scale as the molecular bonding sites of a cell, in the tens of nanometer range. We employ electrochemical methods to grow anodic alumina, which has a naturally ordered pore structure (interpore spacing of 40 to 400 nm) controlled by the anodization potential. We have also developed methods to selectively fill the alumina pores with materials with contrasting properties. Gold, for example, is electrochemically plated into the pores, and the excess material is removed by backsputter etching. The result is a patterned surface with closely separated islands of Au, surrounded by hydrophilic alumina. The pore spacing, which is determined by fabrication parameters, is hypothesized to have a direct effect on the spatial density of adhesion sites. By attaching adhesive molecules to the Au islands, we are able to observe and study cell rolling and adhesion phenomena. Through the measurements it is possible to estimate the length scale of receptor clusters on the cell surface. This information is useful in understanding mechanisms of leukocytes adhesion to endothelial cells as well as the effect of adhesion molecules adaptation on transmission of extracellular forces. The method also has applications in tissue engineering, drug and gene delivery, cell signaling and biocompatibility design.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Masuda, H., Yamada, H., Satoh, M., and Asoh, H., Appl. Phys. Lett., 71, 2770 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Jessensky, O., Müller, F., and Gösele, U., Appl. Phys. Lett., 72, 1173 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Li, A. P., Müller, F., Birner, A., Nielsch, K., and Gösele, U., J. Appl. Phys., 84, 6023 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Asoh, H., Nishio, K., Nakao, M., Tamamura, T., and Masuda, H., J. Electrochem. Soc., 148, B152 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Whitesides, G. M., Ostuni, E., Takayama, S., Jiang, X., and Ingber, D. E., Annu. Rev. Biomed. Eng. 3:335 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. http://www.med.virginia.edu/bme/leyGoogle Scholar
7. JM, Harris, and Zalipsky, S., Poly(ethy-lene Glycol): Chemistry and Biological Applications. Washington, DC: Am. Chem. Soc. (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Helmke, B. P., and Davies, P. F., Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 30. 284 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Helmke, B. P., Thakker, D. B., Goldman, R. D., and Davies, P. F., Biophysical Journal, 80. 184 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Ingber, D.. Curr. Opin. Cell Biol., 3, 841 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Davies, P., Physiol. Rev., 75, 519 (1995)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Wernick, M. N.,Griem, M. L., Robotewskyj, A., and Davies, P. F., J. Vasc. Invest., 4, 15 (1998).Google Scholar
13. Zangari, G., Lambeth, D.N., IEEE Trans. Magn., 33, 3010(1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. http://www.transene.comGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Fabrication of Nanoscale Hydrophobic Regions on Anodic Alumina for Selective Adhesion of Biologic Molecules
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Fabrication of Nanoscale Hydrophobic Regions on Anodic Alumina for Selective Adhesion of Biologic Molecules
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Fabrication of Nanoscale Hydrophobic Regions on Anodic Alumina for Selective Adhesion of Biologic Molecules
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *