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Fabrication and Imaging of Protein Crossover Structures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2011

John R. LaGraff
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323, USA
Yi-Ping Zhao
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
David J. Graber
Affiliation:
Wadsworth Center for Laboratory Research, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201, USA
Dan Rainville
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Siena College, Loudonville, NY 12211, USA
Gwo-Ching Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N.Y, 12180, USA
Toh-Ming Lu
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N.Y, 12180, USA
Quynh Chu-LaGraff
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308, USA
Don Szarowski
Affiliation:
Wadsworth Center for Laboratory Research, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201, USA
William Shain
Affiliation:
Wadsworth Center for Laboratory Research, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201, USA
James N. Turner
Affiliation:
Wadsworth Center for Laboratory Research, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201, USA
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Abstract

Proteins often deform, dehydrate or otherwise denature when adsorbed or patterned directly onto an inorganic substrate, thus losing specificity and biofunctionality. One method used to maintain function is to pattern the protein of interest directly onto another underlying protein or polypeptide that acts as a buffer layer between the substrate and the desired protein. We have used microcontact printing (μcp) to cross-stamp orthogonal linear arrays of two different proteins (e.g., IgG, poly-lysine, protein A) onto glass substrates. This created three separate types of protein-substrate microenvironments, including crossover structures of protein one on protein two. We report preliminary fluorescent microscopy and scanning force microscopy characterization of these structures, including commonly encountered structural defects.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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