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Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Thin Films for Applications in Tissue Engineering: Emphasis on Cell-Surface Interactions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 May 2012

Michael R. Wertheimer
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering Physics, École Polytechnique, Montréal, QC, H3C 3A7, Canada.
Amélie St-Georges-Robillard
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering Physics, École Polytechnique, Montréal, QC, H3C 3A7, Canada.
Sophie Lerouge
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, École de Technologie Supérieure (ÉTS), Montréal, QC, H3C 1K3, Canada, and Centre de recherche du CHUM (CRCHUM).
Fackson Mwale
Affiliation:
Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, McGill University, and Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, 3755, Chemin de la Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal, QC H3T 1E2, Canada.
Bentsian Elkin
Affiliation:
Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology, Nobelstrasse 12, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany.
Christian Oehr
Affiliation:
Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology, Nobelstrasse 12, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany.
Werner Wirges
Affiliation:
Applied Condensed Matter Physics, University of Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam-Golm, Germany.
Reimund Gerhard
Affiliation:
Applied Condensed Matter Physics, University of Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam-Golm, Germany.
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Abstract

In several recent communications from these laboratories, we have described observations that thin organic layers which are rich in primary amine (R-NH2) groups are very efficient surfaces for the adhesion of mammalian cells, even for controlling the differentiation of stem cells. We prepare such deposits by plasma polymerization at low pressure (thin films designated “L-PPE:N”, for “Low-pressure Plasma Polymerized Ethylene containing Nitrogen”), at atmospheric (“High”) pressure (“H-PPE:N”), or by vacuum-ultraviolet photo-polymerization (“UV-PE:N”). More recently, we have also investigated a commercially available material, Parylene diX AM.

In the present communication we shall, first, briefly introduce literature relating to electrostatic interactions between cells, proteins, and charged surfaces. Next, we discuss the comparative results of physico-chemical characterizations of the various organic deposits mentioned above, which deliberately contain varying concentrations of nitrogen, [N], and amine groups, [NH2]. Finally, we present certain selected cell-response results that pertain to applications in orthopedic medicine; we discuss the influence of surface properties on the observed behaviors of various cell lines, with particular emphasis on possible electrostatic attractive forces due to positively charged R-NH3 + groups and negatively charged proteins and cells, respectively.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Thin Films for Applications in Tissue Engineering: Emphasis on Cell-Surface Interactions
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