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Experimental Observation of Formation Processes in Si/SiO2 Interface Defects Using in-situ UHV-ESR System

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

N. Mizuochi
Affiliation:
Diamond Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba-City, Ibaraki, 305-8568, Japan Graduate School of Library, Information and Media Studies, University of Tsukuba, 1-2 Kasuga, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki 305-8550, Japan
W. Futako
Affiliation:
Diamond Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba-City, Ibaraki, 305-8568, Japan
S. Yamasaki
Affiliation:
Diamond Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba-City, Ibaraki, 305-8568, Japan Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba City, 305-8577, Japan
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Abstract

We investigated the process of Pb center generation during silicon oxidation following oxygen termination on a clean Si surface, based on which we discuss the microscopic origin of Pb centers. We constructed a UHV-ESR system which enabled measurements to be carried out at a low temperature of around 100 – 120 K, and used the system to study the Si(111)-7×7 surface after slight exposure to O2. Based on the observed ESR spectra, we discuss the electronic structure of the Si(111)-7×7 surface.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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Experimental Observation of Formation Processes in Si/SiO2 Interface Defects Using in-situ UHV-ESR System
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Experimental Observation of Formation Processes in Si/SiO2 Interface Defects Using in-situ UHV-ESR System
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