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Excimer-Laser Crystallization of Silicon Films: Numerical Simulation of Lateral Solidification

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Vikas V. Gupta
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials Science, and Mining Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027
H. Jin Song
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials Science, and Mining Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027
James S. Im
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials Science, and Mining Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027
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Abstract

We have utilized a recently developed transient two-dimensional model for simulating localized beam-induced melting and solidification of thin silicon films on SiO2. Specifically, by tailoring the lateral beam profile, we simulate those situations that are encountered in the artificially-controlled superlateral growth (ACSLG) method, in which various techniques are utilized to irradiate the sample in preselected regions of a silicon film. The spatially and temporally localized character of heating is simulated by introducing a time-dependent two-dimensional heat-source function. The evolution of melt-creation and ensuing solidification is studied as a function of incident energy density and film thickness. The results show two distinct types of behavior as a function of incident energy density: at low energy densities, partial melting and predominantly vertical solidification occur; while at high energy densities, complete melting of the irradiated portion of the film is followed by rapid lateral solidification.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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Excimer-Laser Crystallization of Silicon Films: Numerical Simulation of Lateral Solidification
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