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Evaluation of Interface Strength between a Copper Submicron Dot and Silicondioxide Substrate

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011

Hiroyuki Hirakata
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering Physics and Mechanics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
Takayuki Kitamura
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering Physics and Mechanics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
Yoshitake Yamamoto
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering Physics and Mechanics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
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Abstract

An experimental evaluation method of interface strength between ductile submicron-dots and a hard substrate is developed. The validity is examined with copper (Cu) cylindrical dots of submicron scale on a silicondioxide (SiO2) substrate. A hard-layer of tungsten (W) is employed to restrain the deformation and concentrate the stress near the free-edge of Cu/SiO2. A diamond tip is dragged horizontally along the SiO2 surface and the load is applied to the side edge of the W layer at a constant displacement rate using a modified atomic force microscope. Both the lateral and the vertical loads and displacements are continuously monitored during the test. After the tip hits the W layer, the lateral load, F l, increases almost proportionally with the lateral displacement, σl. The Cu dot with the W layer then is clearly separated from the SiO2 along the interface. The restraint by the W layer works well so that there are little damages in both the delaminated W/Cu dot and the substrate. The delamination lateral load, F lC, is successfully evaluated.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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