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Eutectoid Decomposition in Three Ti-Co Alloys

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

E. Coomber
Affiliation:
School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK
M. J. Whiting
Affiliation:
School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK
P. Tsakiropoulos
Affiliation:
School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK
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Abstract

The mechanisms of eutectoid decomposition are important because of the widespread use of alloys which exhibit a eutectoid transformation. However, the transformation remains a matter of controversy for a number of reasons. The Ti-Co system is examined in order to test current understanding of eutectoid decomposition.

The high temperature beta phase can transform on cooling into several products - alpha plates, a non-lamellar mixture of alpha and Ti2Co which can be designated bainite, lamellar pearlite, spheroidal pearlite and Ti2Co allotriomorphs. In this study the high temperature beta phase was decomposed in hypoeutectoid, eutectoid and hypereutectoid alloys, for a range of undercoolings. The microstructure and crystallography of the transformation products was characterised by reflected light microscopy, SEM, XRD and TEM. The classification of the transformation products is discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2000

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