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The Engineering of Silicon Wafer Material Properties Through Vacancy Concentration Profile Control and the Achievement of Ideal Oxygen Precipitation Behavior

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

R. Falster
Affiliation:
MEMC Electronic Materials SpA, Viale Gherzi 31, 28100 Novara, Italy
D. Gambaro
Affiliation:
MEMC Electronic Materials SpA, Viale Gherzi 31, 28100 Novara, Italy
M. Olmo
Affiliation:
MEMC Electronic Materials SpA, Viale Gherzi 31, 28100 Novara, Italy
M. Cornara
Affiliation:
MEMC Electronic Materials SpA, Viale Gherzi 31, 28100 Novara, Italy
H. Korb
Affiliation:
MEMC Electronic Materials Inc, 501 Pearl Drive, St Peters, MO, 63376, USA
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Abstract

A new kind of silicon wafer and a new class of materials engineering techniques for silicon wafers is described. This wafer, called the “Magic Denuded Zone” or MDZ wafer, is produced through the manipulation of the vacancy concentration and, in particular, vacancy concentration depth profiles in the wafer prior to the development of oxygen precipitates in subsequent heat treatments. The result is a wafer with ideal oxygen precipitation behavior for use in all types of integrated circuit applications. The methods used to prepare such wafers combine Frenkel pair generation with injection and the use of surface sinks. Simulations of the vacancy profiles produced by these techniques are presented and discussed. It is shown that within the range of vacancy concentration accessible by these techniques (up to ca. 1013 cm−3) the rate and oxygen concentration dependence of oxygen clustering can be substantially modified. Such techniques can be used to precisely engineer unique and desirable oxygen-related defect performance in silicon wafers both in terms of distribution and rate of defect formation. One result of the application of such techniques is an ideally precipitating silicon wafer in which the resulting oxygen precipitate profile (denuded zone depth and bulk density of precipitates) is independent of the concentration of oxygen of the wafer, the details of the crystal growth process used to prepare the wafer and, to a very large extent, the details of thermal cycles used to process the wafer into an electronic device. Optimal, generic and reliable internal gettering performance is achieved in such a wafer

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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