Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-cxxrm Total loading time: 0.787 Render date: 2021-12-06T13:15:29.413Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Electrospun Polymer/MWCNTs Nanofiber Reinforced Composites “Improvement of Interfacial Bonding by Surface Modified Nanofibers”

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Elif Ozden
Affiliation:
elifozden@sabanciuniv.edu, Turkey
Yusuf Ziya Menceloglu
Affiliation:
yusufm@sabanciuniv.edu, Sabanci University, Material Science and Engineering, Istanbul, Turkey
Melih Papila
Affiliation:
mpapila@sabanciuniv.edu, Sabanci University, Material Science and Engineering, Istanbul, Turkey
Get access

Abstract

In-house synthesized copolymers Polystyrene-co-glycidyl methacrylate (PSt-co-GMA) are electrospun as mat of surface modified nanofibers with and without multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Composites are then formed by embedding layers of the nanofiber mats into epoxy resin. Interfacial bonding between polymer matrix and the nanofibers, and surface modification driven enhancement in mechanical response is assessed under flexural loads. Results indicate that at elevated temperture storage modulus of epoxy reinforced by PSt-co-GMA nanofibers and PSt-co-GMA/ MWCNTs composite nanofibers is about 10 and 20 times higher than the neat epoxy, respectively, despite weight fraction of the nanofibers being as low as 2%. Interfacial interaction is revealed by the storage modulus comparison of unmodified Polystyrene (PSt) and modified PSt-co-GMA nanofiber reinforced composite. To enhance further the resulting “crosslinked” structure, crosslinking agent ethylenediamine is also sprayed on the nanofibrous mats. Increased crosslinking density improves mechanical response of sprayed-over PSt-co-GMA nanofibers reinforced composites which is about 4 times higher than plain PSt-co-GMA nanofibers.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1 Kashiwagi, T., Grulke, E., Hilding, J., Harris, R., Macromol. Rapid Comm. 23, 761765 (2002).3.0.CO;2-K>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2 Njuguna, J. and Pielichowski, K., Adv. Eng. Mater., 6, 204210 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3 Treacy, M. M. J, Ebbesen, T. W. and Gibson, J. M., Nature, 381, 678680. (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4 Uchida, T., Kumar, S., J. Appl. Polym. Sci., 98, 985989 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5 Walt, D.H., MRS Bull., 29, 281285 (2004).Google Scholar
6 Wan, Y., He, J. and Yu, J. Yong, Polym Int 56, 13671370 (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7 Ji, J., Sui, G., Yu, Y., J. Phys. Chem. C, 113 (12), 47794785 (2009).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8 Baughman, R. H., Zakhidov, A. A., Heer, W. A., Science, 297, 787792 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9 Njuguna, J., Pielichowski, K. and Desai, S., Polym. Adv. Technol.19: 947959 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10 Ahn, B., Chi, Y., Kang, T., J. of App. Poly. Sci., Vol. 110, 40554063 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11 Sen, R., Zhao, B., Perea, D., Itkis, M. E., Nano Letters, 4 (3), 459464 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12 Seoul, C., Kim, Y., Baek, C., J. Poly. Sci. Part B: Poly. Phys., Vol. 41, 15721577 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13 Suhr, J., Koratkar, N.A., Ye, D. and Lu, T., J. Intel. Mat. Sys.and Struct., Vol. 17 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14 Nyden, M.R., Stoliarov, S.I., Polymer 49, 635641 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15 Chen, L., Gong, X.L. and Li, W.H., Polymer Testing Vol. 27, 3, Pages 340345 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Electrospun Polymer/MWCNTs Nanofiber Reinforced Composites “Improvement of Interfacial Bonding by Surface Modified Nanofibers”
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Electrospun Polymer/MWCNTs Nanofiber Reinforced Composites “Improvement of Interfacial Bonding by Surface Modified Nanofibers”
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Electrospun Polymer/MWCNTs Nanofiber Reinforced Composites “Improvement of Interfacial Bonding by Surface Modified Nanofibers”
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *