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Electronic Structure of Cr2O3 Studied by Photoemission Spectroscopies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Xiaomei Li
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520
Victor E. Henrich
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520
Tomohiko Saitoh
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-Ku,Tokyo 113, Japan
Atsushi Fujimori
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-Ku,Tokyo 113, Japan
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Abstract

The electronic structure of single-crystal Cr2O3 has been studied by Cr 2p core-level XPS and valence-band UPS spectroscopies. A cluster configuration-interaction analysis was applied to investigate the nature of the satellite in the Cr 2p core-level photoemission spectrum. It is argued that the satellite can be understood as a charge-transfer satellite, and Cr2O3 is found to be situated at the boundary between the Mott-Hubbard and the charge-transfer regimes. The values of the charge-transfer energy, Δ, the Coulomb correlation energy, U, and the ligand 2p-cation 3d hybridization energy, T, found from fitting the Cr 2p XPS spectrum were also used to analyze the valence-band UPS spectrum. The comparison between the experimental spectrum and the spectrum from theoretical fitting is fair.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1993

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